From Cubicles to Hot-Desks, Here Are the Origins of the Open-Plan Office

Some love them, some loath them: open-plan office spaces are either conducive to conversation and collaboration or nothing more than noisy environments defined by distractions. Much, for instance, has been questioned recently about the “innovative” open working environments in Apple’s new Cupertino campus. In a new series by Vox, overlooked, misrepresented, and overrated phenomena are put under the microscope. By exploring the work of Frank Lloyd Wright, Herman Miller, and others, this episode posits that open office spaces are, contrary to popular assumption, “misunderstood for their role in workplace culture.”

Where did open offices and cubicles come from, and are they really what we want?

Via Vox.

Is the Open Plan Bad for Us?

The concept of the open plan revolutionized architecture – promising light, space, and effortless collaboration (not to mention a more cost-effective way of getting lots of people into one space). Today, it’s practically become a standard of design – but at what cost?

When One Size Does Not Fit All: Rethinking the Open Office

Workplace design has undergone a radical transformation in the last several decades, with approximately seventy percent of today’s modern offices now converted to open plans. However, despite growing concerns over decreases in worker productivity and employee satisfaction, the open office revolution shows no sign of slowing down.

【Free Cad Drawings Download Center】