Futuristic Architecture of the 70s: Photographs of a Modern World with a Twist of Science Fiction


Avala Tower / Uglješa Bogdanović + Slobodan Janjić + Milan Krstić 1961-1965. Belgrade, Serbia. Image © Stefano Perego

Avala Tower / Uglješa Bogdanović + Slobodan Janjić + Milan Krstić 1961-1965. Belgrade, Serbia. Image © Stefano Perego

The Manifesto of Futurism, written by Italian poet Filippo Tommaso Marinetti in 1909, was the rallying cry for the avant-garde movement driven by the writers, musicians, artists, and even architects (among them Antonio Sant’Elia) in the early 20th century. After the manifesto’s publication, Futurism quickly came to the forefront of public conscience and opened the way for many other cutting edge movements in the art world and beyond.

While the movement would undergo a significant decline in the years following World War II, it reinvented itself decades later during the Space Age, when faith in technology and industry were at a fever-pitch and the world’s powers were racing to put humans on the Moon. All of a sudden, humanity had a new cultural panorama that inspired every facet of society–from musicians, to scientists, to architects. With the combination of engineering and art, not to mention the bountiful scientific achievements of the time, works of architecture turned into works of science fiction. 

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